Posted by: rosec2 | November 20, 2010

Communicating with your newborn/infant

Your newborn begins communication with you immediately after birth through his/her senses. Have you wondered why babies cry a lot when someone beside their mother holds them? Babies are endowed with amazing senses of hearing, touch and sight. One way babies communicate is through cry. As a new mother, am sure you are not surprise about why your baby cries for everything and sometimes even for nothing. Newborns and infants can only communicate by crying. Babies cry when they are hungry, need a diaper change or are wet, needs to be held, wants to sleep, coming down with a fever or generally sick and sometimes for no apparent reason, babies just cry.

As a new mother you need to learn to understand when your baby cries.  This can be frustrating sometimes when you can’t differentiate between what the cry is all about.  As your baby grows and you continue to bond with him/her, you will soon be able to differentiate between the different cries.  Some cries are short and others are long depending on the need and how soon you attend to them.  Sometimes after you’ve done everything, babies will still cry and this could be a sign of sickness or sometimes they may be nothing wrong.  Learn to understand your baby’s cry and you can attend to his/her  needs better.


Responses

  1. It must be hard to differentiate the cries of a baby, but I think that like the baby, the mother also has amazing senses to be able to figure that out! The communication between a mother and her child is so interesting and special. I would be interested in learning more about this connection and how it is strengthened.

  2. So does a parent eventually learn to distinguish what the different cries mean?

  3. When my niece was an infant my whole family always made sure to smile at her and never to frown, now she is such a smiley toddler!

  4. I just spend the week with my sister and my 2 year old nephew. He talks a lot for his age, but i can hardly understand any of it. It is amazing because his mom understands everything. There really is some special connection there!

  5. Are there any website that might help a parent identify certain types of crying?

  6. I babysat a little boy whose mother taught him some basic sign language. IT was amazing! He picked it up so fast. And could tell me when he needed more, wanted milk, or something like that. And he was learning how to say thank you and please.

  7. It is so amazing to me that there are books now that tell what different types of cries mean. When my granddaughter was born we keep looking up what kind of a cry she was doing it gave us a clue as to what was wrong. I still think mothers instinct is best.

  8. This is a daunting task; interpreting cries. I think that when I am one day a mother I will be able to innately know the distinction between cries!

  9. Children are learning from day one that is why it is important for them to be born into families that love them 🙂 Thanks for posting!

  10. Sometimes I wish babies could talk, but I think as the parent learns to read their baby they help build a bond.

  11. It really can be difficult to understand the needs of babies. We have found, that as infants become older, sign language can be very beneficial.

  12. It really is cool the bonds that mothers and babies have, and it makes sense because of the time spent together, the more time you put into anything, the more you understand it.

  13. I have totally seen this happen with new mothers I know and how their baby will start crying and they know right away that they’re just tired or hungry. Kind of reaffirms to me the importance of breastfeeding to help build that bond between mother and baby.

  14. I’m not a mom, but I was a nanny, and even just over the course of a few months I sort of started to at least notice the differences in types of crying, whether or not I always translated them perfectly. I agree with Kylie!

  15. I have a feeling this would be hard for a lot of people, but at the same time very important. Getting to know everything about your baby is the best way to better taking care of them. Thanks for the suggestions.

  16. Interesting post. I have a read about a new term called purple crying that takes place in the first few months. Apparently babies cry for no reason at all. I’m not sure how accurate that is however.

  17. I think it is so cool when a mom knows the cry of her baby and what the baby needs. i hope i can be like that one day.

  18. Crying babies was the norm at my house. It’s been different to live away from home and have everything be so silent.

  19. The older I get, the more I realize the importance of communication, and that does not exclude babies. They too have needs and they have their own way of letting us know what they need.

  20. I sure hope I get this instinct when I become a mother to know what they want! It is true though that moms usually know

  21. It is really cool how people can learn to distinguish between different types of cries! Thanks for sharing!

  22. I worked at a gym over the summer and often had to watch babies and infants. It got a little frustrating when a baby would not stop crying. The important thing for me was to keep patient and not stop trying to figure out what the baby or infant needed. Eventually they would get tired of crying or I’d be able to distract them, but it’s hard to imagine what a mother has to do and how much time goes into getting to know how your baby communicates his or her different needs.

  23. This is such a great idea for a blog! I’ve learned so much and can’t wait to use these tips and tricks and on my own children.

  24. My sister taught her baby to use sing language to communicate wether he was hungry or thirsty etc. and it has helped them so much to understand exactly what their baby needs.

  25. This must be really frustrating! thank you for the hyperlinks! great info!

  26. sometimes it is so difficult to handle a crying baby, you try everything you can and in the end they just cry until they fall asleep.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: